7Jul
Bistability Emerges From Neuron-Glial Interactions in the Healthy and Diseased Brain
7 July 2020
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Maurizio De Pitta (Bilbao, Spain)

The anatomical and functional coupling between neurons and astrocytes a prominent type of glial cells of the cortex is an essential component of the brain physiology in health and disease. Astrocytes are fundamental in clearing glutamate from the extracellular space, preventing excitotoxicity by extracellular accumulation of this neurotransmitter. At the same time, astrocytes can also release glutamate into the extracellular space in an activity- dependent fashion, mediating neuromodulation. Although we may expect that both glutamatergic neuromodulation and glutamate uptake by astrocytes likely play a part in higher brain functions, the biophysical underpinnings accounting for this possibility remain elusive. Considering the case study of Alzheimer’s disease, I present experimental and modeling results pinpointing a bistable regulation of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes, in the early stages of the disease that prelude to cognitive impairment. Then, scaling up from the synaptic microenvironment to networks, I introduce theoretical arguments in support of the possibility that bistability could also ensue from astrocytic modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In this context, a neuron-glial network model is developed to test the hypothesis that astrocytic neuromodulation could promote the emergence of persistent neural firing, with important implications for our current working memory framework. Finally, I conclude with an overview of some possible directions to complement and extend the above results, in the spirit of unifying computational approaches to harness the staggering complexity of the neuropil.

More Info

26Jun
A Systems Approach to Identifying Optimal Treatment Courses for Complex Chronic Neuroinflammatory Illnesses
26 June 2020
14:00 - 15:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Travis Craddock (Florida)

Discovering novel treatment strategies for complex chronic illnesses through traditional discovery pipelines is extremely expensive, carries a high probability of failure, and a lengthy cycle time. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that “one target, one treatment” solutions may not be capable of addressing difficult conditions. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration approved drugs offers a cost-effective solution with a significantly abbreviated timeline. Furthermore, combining multi-system modeling with these bioinformatics techniques can harness the regulatory dynamics of the human body to identify robust treatment courses that might produce lasting remission. Here it will be discussed how differentially expressed gene modules cross-referenced with drug atlas and pharmacogenomic databases can be used to identify targetable systems and agents. Based on these results it will be discussed how to construct a discrete ternary logic representation of signaling networks from physiological and biochemical literature to provide a qualitative description of multi-system behavior. By exploiting the regulatory dynamics of the resulting model through the application of a combinatorial optimization scheme and Monte Carlo simulation, it will be discussed how to predict treatment courses that might produce lasting disease remission. While the methods presented here can be applied generally, they will be discussed in the context of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Gulf War Illness, debilitating chronic multi-symptom disorders for which there is no known treatment.

More Info

24Jun
Neural Dynamics of Cognitive Control
24 June 2020
10:00 - 11:00 AM
Virtually via Zoom
Dominic Standage (Birmingham, UK)

I will describe two recent studies on the use of strategies toward cognitively demanding tasks. One study used neural models to investigate the storage limitations of working memory. The other used graphical methods with functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate sensorimotor adaptation. Both studies provide evidence that cognitive strategies are supported by the control of distributed neural dynamics, and that these dynamics explain group differences in task performance. I will discuss relationships between these and related tasks and methodologies, how they provide a foundation for investigating the neural bases of cognition, and their potential for clinical research on neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment.

More Info

23Jun
Multiregional Neural Dynamics and Distributed Control of Cognitive Computations
23 June 2020
13:00 - 14:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Jorge Jaramillo (NY)

Computational modeling of cognitive processes has largely focused on single cortical areas, but the engagement of multi-regional brain circuits in these processes is not completely understood. In the first part of my talk, I will present a circuit model to study the shared and unique roles of frontal and parietal cortices in a variety of cognitive tasks. We found that structural differences between these cortical areas map onto complementary dynamical regimes that subserve working memory and decision-making computations. Next, I consider the primate pulvinar, which is the largest part of the visual thalamus and is reciprocally connected to multiple visual and association cortical areas. I put forward a framework of pulvino-cortical interactions to clarify the pulvinar’s involvement in attention, confidence, and communication. I will also present a circuit model of thalamo-cortical interactions during motor planning, constrained by multisite recordings in the mouse. We propose that subcortical inputs to the thalamus selectively gate cortical ‘activity modes’ relevant for movement. Overall, the modeling results support the existence of computational principles for distributed and large-scale interactions in the brain that we are only beginning to uncover. At the end of the talk, I will suggest a roadmap towards ‘cognitive Deep Brain Stimulation’, which combines large-scale circuit modeling with a ‘virtual’ stimulation protocol to study the effects of exogenous stimulation on cognitive processes.

More Info

17Jun
A Multiscale Perspective of Cortical Computational Dynamics
17 June 2020
13:00 - 14:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Nima Dehghani (Tufts University)

What does a quantitative theory of cortex entail? What are the computational principles that underlie cortical dynamics? Despite the fast pace of discoveries and progress in disparate domains of neuroscience, the lack of unifying principles and fundamental theories of the cortex is vividly apparent. The key shortcoming is that the inherent nature of the brain as a complex adaptive system and multiscale aspects of information processing in neuronal networks are mostly ignored or sacrificed to fit the reductionist approach. To develop a theory of cortical computation, one must address collective information processing and understand ensemble pattern formation at multiple scales. In search of a global theory of cortex, I explored several aspects of neuro-signals at multiple scales and conditions. These included the variability of oscillatory patterns, oscillatory entrainment of ensemble spiking, wave propagation, ensemble excitation/ inhibition balance, and the emergence of network disorder (seizure). The insights gleaned from these collective computational dynamics provide the foundation for a multiscale cortical quantitative theory of cortex that will guide us in the design of the next generation of neuro-inspired computational algorithms and biomedical devices.

More Info

16Jun
Canadian Computational Neuroscience Spotlight
16 June 2020
09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Virtually, via Crowdcast
Scott Rich, Milad Lankarany, Andreea Diaconescu and John Griffiths

15Jun
Canadian Computational Neuroscience Spotlight
15 June 2020
09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Virtually, via Crowdcast
Scott Rich, Milad Lankarany, Andreea Diaconescu and John Griffiths


29May
Analysis of Inhibitory Interneuronal Networks using Phase Plane and Phase Responses
29 May 2020
14:00 - 15:30 PM
virtually
Carmen Canavier (New Orleans)

There are two major theories of how gamma oscillations arise in the brain: the stochastic population oscillator theory and coupled oscillator theory. In the former, the relevant oscillator is the local circuit comprised of a population of individual neurons in the fluctuation driven regime, whereas in the latter it is an oscillator in the mean driven regime. In the latter, the intrinsic oscillatory properties of individual neurons matter, in the former they do not. An important aspect of the intrinsic dynamics is whether the mathematical bifurcation giving rise to spiking is a subcritical Hopf leading to an abrupt onset of spiking at a nonzero frequency (type 1), or a saddle node on an invariant circle that allows arbitrarily slow firing (type 1). We and others have shown that PV+ fast spiking interneurons in layers 2 and 3 of the entorhinal cortex have Hodgkin’s type 2 excitability, whereas others have shown that those area CA1 have type 1 excitability. Here we explain using phase plane techniques that in some ways coupled type 1 inhibitory neurons synchronize better with shunting inhibition, whereas type 2 synchronize better with hyperpolarizing inhibition. We also analyzed the tendency of populations of coupled interneurons to break into clusters using phase response curve theory. Finally, we examine the evidence that interneurons are in the oscillatory rather than the subthreshold regime during gamma oscillations.

More Info

14May
Internal KCN: 'structural' and 'kinetic' phase plane of excitability
14 May 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
virtually via Zoom
Frances Skinner

30Apr
Internal KCN: Potentials evoked by DBS at the STN
30 April 2020
10:00 AM - 11:30 PM
virtually
Taha Morshedzadeh

9Apr
Internal KCN: New computational model for seizure propagation
9 April 2020
10:00 - 11:00 AM
virtually
Scott Rich

In this virtual lab meeting, Scott will discuss a new paper that presents a new model that mimics experimental recordings of seizure propagation in the cortex.

More Info

26Mar
Biological variability and model databases (Zoom link available)
26 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Frances Skinner

Lecturer: Frances Skinner (Krembil)

More Info

26Mar
Internal KCN: A Neuromorphic Prosthesis to Restore Communication in Neuronal Networks (Zoom link available)
26 March 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
virtually
Idir Mellal

Idir Mellal will present this recent paper talking about developing a novel real-time neuromorphic system acting as a neuroprosthesis to re-establish bi-directionally the communication between two disconnected neuronal populations.

More Info

19Mar
Deep brain stimulation induced synaptic plasticity (Zoom link available)
19 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Milad Lankarany

Lecturer: Milad Lankarany (Krembil)

More Info

18Mar
Overview of the lab of Uludag & Spiking Neuronal Network Modeling (CANCELLED)
18 March 2020
12:30 - 14:00 PM
4KDT503
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Kamil Uludag

Dr. Uludag and his postdoc, Dr. Soheila Nazari, will be presenting in the Valiante Lab Meeting.

More Info

12Mar
Computational approaches to pain research
12 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Steve Prescott

Lecturer: Steve Prescott (Sickkids)

More Info

12Mar
Internal KCN: theta-gamma/AZ
12 March 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Alexandra Chatzikalymniou

Alexandra Pierri C. will present the attached recent paper on theta gamma coupling and the role of PV+ cells stimulation in rescuing memory loss in in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. For those interested, a quick overview of that work can be found in the interview also attached.

More Info

5Mar
Epilepsy: A window to brain mechanisms
5 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Taufik Valiante

Lecturer: Taufik Valiante (Krembil)

More Info

27Feb
Internal KCN: Aaron Schifman (visitor)
27 February 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Aaron Schifman

Aaron will be visiting from Ottawa and will present his work entitled "Multi-scale Bioelectric Fields: Implications for neural dynamics and sensing.”

More Info

27Feb
Neural oscillations and brain stimulation
27 February 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Jeremie Lefebvre

Lecturer: Jeremie Lefebvre (Ottawa, Krembil)

More Info

14Feb
Differential short-term synaptic dynamics related to stimulation of human single-neurons
14 February 2020
15:00 - 16:00 PM
Room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Luka Milosevic

Speaker: Luka Milosevic

More Info

13Feb
Internal KCN: Alireza Ghadimi
13 February 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Alireza Ghadimi

For next week lab meeting presentation Alireza is going to talk about the following paper and also some of his simulations around it: "Estimating short-term synaptic plasticity from pre- and postsynaptic spiking"

More Info

13Feb
Whole-brain modelling: from macro-connectomics to spatiotemporal neural dynamics
13 February 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
John Griffths

Lecturer: John Griffths (CAMH)

More Info

30Jan
Internal KCN: Yupeng Tian
30 January 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Yupeng Tian

Yupeng will present their work on a R-peak detection algorithm of textile waist-recorded ECG signals using HDIG (History Dependent Inverse Gaussian) model, and textile waist-ECG noise modelling.

More Info

24Jan
Humans are not rodents: the implications of these differences, uncovered via computational modeling, for understanding seizure initiation
24 January 2020
13:00 - 14:00 PM
Main Auditorium, West Wing, 2nd Floor, Room 401
Toronto Western Hospital
Scott Rich

16Jan
Internal KCN: Scott Rich
16 January 2020
10:00 - 11:00 AM
4KD505
Scott Rich

Scott Rich will present/practice his talk tilted: Humans are not rodents: the implications of these differences, uncovered via computational modeling, for understanding seizure initiation. France Skinner will be sharing “the discussion of interdisciplinary research from the beginning of the computational neuroscience course”.

More Info


7Jul
Bistability Emerges From Neuron-Glial Interactions in the Healthy and Diseased Brain
7 July 2020
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Maurizio De Pitta (Bilbao, Spain)

The anatomical and functional coupling between neurons and astrocytes a prominent type of glial cells of the cortex is an essential component of the brain physiology in health and disease. Astrocytes are fundamental in clearing glutamate from the extracellular space, preventing excitotoxicity by extracellular accumulation of this neurotransmitter. At the same time, astrocytes can also release glutamate into the extracellular space in an activity- dependent fashion, mediating neuromodulation. Although we may expect that both glutamatergic neuromodulation and glutamate uptake by astrocytes likely play a part in higher brain functions, the biophysical underpinnings accounting for this possibility remain elusive. Considering the case study of Alzheimer’s disease, I present experimental and modeling results pinpointing a bistable regulation of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes, in the early stages of the disease that prelude to cognitive impairment. Then, scaling up from the synaptic microenvironment to networks, I introduce theoretical arguments in support of the possibility that bistability could also ensue from astrocytic modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In this context, a neuron-glial network model is developed to test the hypothesis that astrocytic neuromodulation could promote the emergence of persistent neural firing, with important implications for our current working memory framework. Finally, I conclude with an overview of some possible directions to complement and extend the above results, in the spirit of unifying computational approaches to harness the staggering complexity of the neuropil.

More Info

26Jun
A Systems Approach to Identifying Optimal Treatment Courses for Complex Chronic Neuroinflammatory Illnesses
26 June 2020
14:00 - 15:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Travis Craddock (Florida)

Discovering novel treatment strategies for complex chronic illnesses through traditional discovery pipelines is extremely expensive, carries a high probability of failure, and a lengthy cycle time. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that “one target, one treatment” solutions may not be capable of addressing difficult conditions. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration approved drugs offers a cost-effective solution with a significantly abbreviated timeline. Furthermore, combining multi-system modeling with these bioinformatics techniques can harness the regulatory dynamics of the human body to identify robust treatment courses that might produce lasting remission. Here it will be discussed how differentially expressed gene modules cross-referenced with drug atlas and pharmacogenomic databases can be used to identify targetable systems and agents. Based on these results it will be discussed how to construct a discrete ternary logic representation of signaling networks from physiological and biochemical literature to provide a qualitative description of multi-system behavior. By exploiting the regulatory dynamics of the resulting model through the application of a combinatorial optimization scheme and Monte Carlo simulation, it will be discussed how to predict treatment courses that might produce lasting disease remission. While the methods presented here can be applied generally, they will be discussed in the context of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Gulf War Illness, debilitating chronic multi-symptom disorders for which there is no known treatment.

More Info

24Jun
Neural Dynamics of Cognitive Control
24 June 2020
10:00 - 11:00 AM
Virtually via Zoom
Dominic Standage (Birmingham, UK)

I will describe two recent studies on the use of strategies toward cognitively demanding tasks. One study used neural models to investigate the storage limitations of working memory. The other used graphical methods with functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate sensorimotor adaptation. Both studies provide evidence that cognitive strategies are supported by the control of distributed neural dynamics, and that these dynamics explain group differences in task performance. I will discuss relationships between these and related tasks and methodologies, how they provide a foundation for investigating the neural bases of cognition, and their potential for clinical research on neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment.

More Info

23Jun
Multiregional Neural Dynamics and Distributed Control of Cognitive Computations
23 June 2020
13:00 - 14:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Jorge Jaramillo (NY)

Computational modeling of cognitive processes has largely focused on single cortical areas, but the engagement of multi-regional brain circuits in these processes is not completely understood. In the first part of my talk, I will present a circuit model to study the shared and unique roles of frontal and parietal cortices in a variety of cognitive tasks. We found that structural differences between these cortical areas map onto complementary dynamical regimes that subserve working memory and decision-making computations. Next, I consider the primate pulvinar, which is the largest part of the visual thalamus and is reciprocally connected to multiple visual and association cortical areas. I put forward a framework of pulvino-cortical interactions to clarify the pulvinar’s involvement in attention, confidence, and communication. I will also present a circuit model of thalamo-cortical interactions during motor planning, constrained by multisite recordings in the mouse. We propose that subcortical inputs to the thalamus selectively gate cortical ‘activity modes’ relevant for movement. Overall, the modeling results support the existence of computational principles for distributed and large-scale interactions in the brain that we are only beginning to uncover. At the end of the talk, I will suggest a roadmap towards ‘cognitive Deep Brain Stimulation’, which combines large-scale circuit modeling with a ‘virtual’ stimulation protocol to study the effects of exogenous stimulation on cognitive processes.

More Info

17Jun
A Multiscale Perspective of Cortical Computational Dynamics
17 June 2020
13:00 - 14:00 PM
Virtually via Zoom
Nima Dehghani (Tufts University)

What does a quantitative theory of cortex entail? What are the computational principles that underlie cortical dynamics? Despite the fast pace of discoveries and progress in disparate domains of neuroscience, the lack of unifying principles and fundamental theories of the cortex is vividly apparent. The key shortcoming is that the inherent nature of the brain as a complex adaptive system and multiscale aspects of information processing in neuronal networks are mostly ignored or sacrificed to fit the reductionist approach. To develop a theory of cortical computation, one must address collective information processing and understand ensemble pattern formation at multiple scales. In search of a global theory of cortex, I explored several aspects of neuro-signals at multiple scales and conditions. These included the variability of oscillatory patterns, oscillatory entrainment of ensemble spiking, wave propagation, ensemble excitation/ inhibition balance, and the emergence of network disorder (seizure). The insights gleaned from these collective computational dynamics provide the foundation for a multiscale cortical quantitative theory of cortex that will guide us in the design of the next generation of neuro-inspired computational algorithms and biomedical devices.

More Info

16Jun
Canadian Computational Neuroscience Spotlight
16 June 2020
09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Virtually, via Crowdcast
Scott Rich, Milad Lankarany, Andreea Diaconescu and John Griffiths

15Jun
Canadian Computational Neuroscience Spotlight
15 June 2020
09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Virtually, via Crowdcast
Scott Rich, Milad Lankarany, Andreea Diaconescu and John Griffiths


29May
Analysis of Inhibitory Interneuronal Networks using Phase Plane and Phase Responses
29 May 2020
14:00 - 15:30 PM
virtually
Carmen Canavier (New Orleans)

There are two major theories of how gamma oscillations arise in the brain: the stochastic population oscillator theory and coupled oscillator theory. In the former, the relevant oscillator is the local circuit comprised of a population of individual neurons in the fluctuation driven regime, whereas in the latter it is an oscillator in the mean driven regime. In the latter, the intrinsic oscillatory properties of individual neurons matter, in the former they do not. An important aspect of the intrinsic dynamics is whether the mathematical bifurcation giving rise to spiking is a subcritical Hopf leading to an abrupt onset of spiking at a nonzero frequency (type 1), or a saddle node on an invariant circle that allows arbitrarily slow firing (type 1). We and others have shown that PV+ fast spiking interneurons in layers 2 and 3 of the entorhinal cortex have Hodgkin’s type 2 excitability, whereas others have shown that those area CA1 have type 1 excitability. Here we explain using phase plane techniques that in some ways coupled type 1 inhibitory neurons synchronize better with shunting inhibition, whereas type 2 synchronize better with hyperpolarizing inhibition. We also analyzed the tendency of populations of coupled interneurons to break into clusters using phase response curve theory. Finally, we examine the evidence that interneurons are in the oscillatory rather than the subthreshold regime during gamma oscillations.

More Info

14May
Internal KCN: 'structural' and 'kinetic' phase plane of excitability
14 May 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
virtually via Zoom
Frances Skinner

30Apr
Internal KCN: Potentials evoked by DBS at the STN
30 April 2020
10:00 AM - 11:30 PM
virtually
Taha Morshedzadeh

9Apr
Internal KCN: New computational model for seizure propagation
9 April 2020
10:00 - 11:00 AM
virtually
Scott Rich

In this virtual lab meeting, Scott will discuss a new paper that presents a new model that mimics experimental recordings of seizure propagation in the cortex.

More Info

26Mar
Biological variability and model databases (Zoom link available)
26 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Frances Skinner

Lecturer: Frances Skinner (Krembil)

More Info

26Mar
Internal KCN: A Neuromorphic Prosthesis to Restore Communication in Neuronal Networks (Zoom link available)
26 March 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
virtually
Idir Mellal

Idir Mellal will present this recent paper talking about developing a novel real-time neuromorphic system acting as a neuroprosthesis to re-establish bi-directionally the communication between two disconnected neuronal populations.

More Info

19Mar
Deep brain stimulation induced synaptic plasticity (Zoom link available)
19 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Milad Lankarany

Lecturer: Milad Lankarany (Krembil)

More Info

18Mar
Overview of the lab of Uludag & Spiking Neuronal Network Modeling (CANCELLED)
18 March 2020
12:30 - 14:00 PM
4KDT503
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Kamil Uludag

Dr. Uludag and his postdoc, Dr. Soheila Nazari, will be presenting in the Valiante Lab Meeting.

More Info

12Mar
Computational approaches to pain research
12 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Steve Prescott

Lecturer: Steve Prescott (Sickkids)

More Info

12Mar
Internal KCN: theta-gamma/AZ
12 March 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Alexandra Chatzikalymniou

Alexandra Pierri C. will present the attached recent paper on theta gamma coupling and the role of PV+ cells stimulation in rescuing memory loss in in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. For those interested, a quick overview of that work can be found in the interview also attached.

More Info

5Mar
Epilepsy: A window to brain mechanisms
5 March 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Taufik Valiante

Lecturer: Taufik Valiante (Krembil)

More Info

27Feb
Internal KCN: Aaron Schifman (visitor)
27 February 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Aaron Schifman

Aaron will be visiting from Ottawa and will present his work entitled "Multi-scale Bioelectric Fields: Implications for neural dynamics and sensing.”

More Info

27Feb
Neural oscillations and brain stimulation
27 February 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Jeremie Lefebvre

Lecturer: Jeremie Lefebvre (Ottawa, Krembil)

More Info

14Feb
Differential short-term synaptic dynamics related to stimulation of human single-neurons
14 February 2020
15:00 - 16:00 PM
Room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
Luka Milosevic

Speaker: Luka Milosevic

More Info

13Feb
Internal KCN: Alireza Ghadimi
13 February 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Alireza Ghadimi

For next week lab meeting presentation Alireza is going to talk about the following paper and also some of his simulations around it: "Estimating short-term synaptic plasticity from pre- and postsynaptic spiking"

More Info

13Feb
Whole-brain modelling: from macro-connectomics to spatiotemporal neural dynamics
13 February 2020
13:30 - 15:30 PM
room 503 (4KD503)
Krembil Discovery Tower, 4th floor
John Griffths

Lecturer: John Griffths (CAMH)

More Info

30Jan
Internal KCN: Yupeng Tian
30 January 2020
10:00 - 11:30 AM
4KD505
Yupeng Tian

Yupeng will present their work on a R-peak detection algorithm of textile waist-recorded ECG signals using HDIG (History Dependent Inverse Gaussian) model, and textile waist-ECG noise modelling.

More Info

24Jan
Humans are not rodents: the implications of these differences, uncovered via computational modeling, for understanding seizure initiation
24 January 2020
13:00 - 14:00 PM
Main Auditorium, West Wing, 2nd Floor, Room 401
Toronto Western Hospital
Scott Rich

16Jan
Internal KCN: Scott Rich
16 January 2020
10:00 - 11:00 AM
4KD505
Scott Rich

Scott Rich will present/practice his talk tilted: Humans are not rodents: the implications of these differences, uncovered via computational modeling, for understanding seizure initiation. France Skinner will be sharing “the discussion of interdisciplinary research from the beginning of the computational neuroscience course”.

More Info

For information on KCN Events prior to 2020, please visit our archive.

KCNhub members can access planning and past presentation slides here.